McConnell Ill-Advised to Vote for Conviction in Senate Impeachment Trial

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"Mitch McConnell" (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) by McConnell Center

The Senate is presently in the middle of an impeachment trial against a former president. Many Republican senators argued that a trial of this nature is unconstitutional; although, nonetheless, the Democrat-led Senate voted to proceed anyway.

This week, Trump’s lead impeachment attorney started his opening remarks by giving a very lackluster defense. Bruce Castor Jr. didn’t impress Senate Republicans, nor did he gain the approval of the 45th president either.


“President Trump Travels to Texas” (Public Domain) by The Trump White House Archived

Yesterday, House impeachment managers dropped the ball as well. Impeachment managers were actually forced to withdraw certain remarks that were wrongly attributed to Sen. Mike Lee.

All in all, the Senate impeachment trial is a mess. Now, breaking reports from Newsmax confirm that Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell will put himself in a very bad spot if he votes for the conviction of Donald Trump.

The Reality for Mitch McConnell

Earlier this week, California GOP Rep. Devin Nunes spoke with NewsmaxTV about the reality for the Senate Minority Leader. Nunes explained that while McConnell hasn’t publicly backed the impeachment trial as constitutional, he also hasn’t come out with confirmation that he’ll vote to acquit Trump.


If McConnell does not vote for Trump’s acquittal, however, the California representative maintains that a conviction vote from McConnell would be “really destructive” and “career-ending” for the Senate Minority Leader. Ultimately, however, Nunes explained that he hasn’t a clue as to the decision that McConnell will ultimately make.

Distancing Himself from the Impeachment Trial

In the final days of Trump’s presidency, McConnell was reportedly exasperated with the 45th president. Apparently, the then-Senate Majority Leader didn’t take well to assertions of voter fraud. Furthermore, the insurrection that befell Capitol Hill on the 6th of January was also reportedly the last straw for McConnell.

At this time, the Senate Minority Leader appears to be distancing himself from the ongoing impeachment trial. Most of McConnell’s public remarks and online postings have revolved around policy matters, coronavirus relief, and the current spending package that Democrats are working to pass.

As things currently stand, McConnell is unlikely to publicly announce whether he’ll vote to acquit or convict Donald Trump.


Do you agree with Rep. Devin Nunes’ assessment of the Senate Minority Leader? Do you believe McConnell will ultimately vote for the 45th president’s acquittal or conviction? Be sure to let us know down below in the comments section.